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Hồ Gươm Lake

Hồ Gươm Lake

According to the legend, in early 1428, Emperor Lê Lợi was boating on the lake when a Golden Turtle God (Kim Qui) surfaced and asked for his magic sword, Heaven's Will. Lợi concluded that Kim Qui had come to reclaim the sword that its master, a local God, the Dragon King (Long Vương) had given Lợi some time earlier, during his revolt against Ming China. Later, Emperor Lợi gave the sword back to the turtle after he finished fighting off the Chinese. Emperor Lợi renamed the lake to commemorate this event, from its former name Luc Thuy meaning "Green Water". The Turtle Tower (Tháp Rùa) standing on a small island near the centre of lake is linked to the legend. The first name of Hoàn Kiếm lake is Tả Vọng, when the King hadn't given the Magical Sword back to the Golden Turtle God (Cụ Rùa).
Temple of Literature, Hanoi

Temple of Literature, Hanoi

The temple was built in 1070 and was reconstructed during the Trần dynasty (1225–1400) and in the subsequent dynasties. For nearly two centuries, despite wars and disasters, the temple has preserved ancient architectural styles of many dynasties as well as precious relics. The temple layout is similar to that of the temple at Qufu, Shandong, Confucius' birthplace. It covers an area of over 54000 square metres, including the Văn lake, Giám park and the interior courtyards which are surrounded by a brick wall.[5] In front of the Great Gate are four tall pillars. On either side of the pillars are two stelae commanding horsemen to dismount.
Cổ Loa Citadel

Cổ Loa Citadel

According to folklore, Thục Phán defeated the last of the Hung kings in 257 bce and founded the kingdom of Âu Lạc, choosing the site of Cổ Loa as his capital. Given its relatively large size, Cổ Loa maintained its dominant presence in the northern floodplain of the Red River Delta and would have required a large amount of labour and resources to construct.The mythical story goes that when the fortress was being built, all the work done during the day was mysteriously destroyed at night. The king made a sacrifice to the gods and in one night, a golden turtle appeared to him in a dream and told him the fortress was built on the turtle's carapace
Imperial Citadel of Thăng Long

Imperial Citadel of Thăng Long

The royal enclosure was first built during the Lý Dynasty (1010) and subsequently expanded by the Trần, Lê and finally the Nguyễn Dynasty. It remained the seat of the Vietnamese court until 1810, when the Nguyen Dynasty chose to move the capital to Huế. The ruins roughly coincide with the Hanoi Citadel today. The royal palaces and most of the structures in Thang Long were in varying states of disrepair by the late 19th century with the upheaval of the French conquest of Hanoi. By the 20th century many of the remaining structures were torn down. Only in the 21st century are the ruin foundations of Thang Long Imperial City systematically excavated.
Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum

Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum

The royal enclosure was first built during the Lý Dynasty (1010) and subsequently expanded by the Trần, Lê and finally the Nguyễn Dynasty. It remained the seat of the Vietnamese court until 1810, when the Nguyen Dynasty chose to move the capital to Huế. The ruins roughly coincide with the Hanoi Citadel today. The royal palaces and most of the structures in Thang Long were in varying states of disrepair by the late 19th century with the upheaval of the French conquest of Hanoi. By the 20th century many of the remaining structures were torn down. Only in the 21st century are the ruin foundations of Thang Long Imperial City systematically excavated.
Flag Tower of Hanoi

Flag Tower of Hanoi

The tower was built in 1812 during the Nguyen dynasty as an observation post to the Hanoi Citadel. Unlike many other structures in Hanoi, it was not destroyed during the French invasion (1896-1897), and was continuously used as a military post. It is now located in the Vietnam Military History Museum. Cột cờ is composed of three tiers and a pyramid-shaped tower with a spiral staircase leading to the top inside it. The first tier is 42.5 m wide and 3.1 m high; the second - 25 m wide and 3.7 m high and the third - 12.8 m wide and 5.1 m high. The second tier has four doors. The words "Nghênh Húc" (English: "To welcome dawn's sunlight") are inscribed on the eastern door; the words "Hồi Quang" ("To reflect light") - on the western door and "Hướng Minh" ("Directed to the sunlight") - on the southern door. The tower is lighted by 36 flower-shaped and 6 fan-shaped windows. The National Flag of Vietnam is on top of the tower.
Hanoi Opera House

Hanoi Opera House

It was modeled on the Palais Garnier, the older of Paris's two opera houses, and is considered to be one of the architectural landmarks of Hanoi. After the departure of the French the opera house became the scene for several political events. The Hanoi Opera House provides the names for the neighboring Hilton Hanoi Opera Hotel which opened in 1999, as well as for the MGallery Hotel de l'Opera Hanoi, which opened in 2011. For historical reasons associated with the Vietnam war, the Hilton Hanoi Opera Hotel was not named the Hanoi Hilton.
Hỏa Lò Prison

Hỏa Lò Prison

The name Hoa Lo, commonly translated as "fiery furnace" or even "Hell's hole", also means "stove". The name originated from the street name phố Hỏa Lò, due to the concentration of stores selling wood stoves and coal-fire stoves along the street from pre-colonial times. The prison was built in Hanoi by the French, in dates ranging from 1886–1889 to 1898 to 1901, when Vietnam was still part of French Indochina. The French called the prison Maison Centrale – literally, Central House-, which is still the designation of prisons for dangerous and/or long sentence detainees in France. It was located near Hanoi's French Quarter. It was intended to hold Vietnamese prisoners, particularly political prisoners agitating for independence who were often subject to torture and execution
State Guest House

State Guest House

The State Guest House (Vietnamese: Nhà khách Chính phủ) is a historical monument in Hoàn Kiếm District, Hanoi, Vietnam. It originally was the Residential Palace of the Tonkin Governor (French: Le Palais du Résident Supérieur du Tonkin, Vietnamese: Dinh Toàn Quyền Bắc Kỳ), built between 1918 and 1919 to house the French Governor of Tonkin. It was later renamed the Tonkin Palace (Vietnamese: Bắc Bộ Phủ) when the Viet Minh took over northern Vietnam. The building is a representative of French Colonial architecture in French Indochina.
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